The Commemoration Has Concluded but the Legacies Continue!

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Events Calendar

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Plymouth 400
Commemoration

Join us for Episode Eleven of our Plymouth 400 CONVERSATIONS series on PACTV (Plymouth Area Community Television)!  The program will air on August 19th & 26th at 7:30PM on Comcast channel 13 and Verizon channel 43 in the towns of Plymouth, Duxbury, Kingston, and Pembroke. After the program airs, you can view the episode here.

Episode 11 will feature the Plymouth Tapestry at Pilgrim Hall Museum.

 

Our guests for this episode are Dr. Donna Curtin, Elizabeth Creeden, and Paula Marcoux.

 

DR. DONNA CURTIN is Executive Director of the Pilgrim Society and Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth, MA, the oldest continuous Museum in the United States, where she stewards the world’s most significant collection of the possessions of the Mayflower Pilgrims and seeks to foster inclusive understandings of America’s colonial beginnings. The Museum commissioned the Plymouth Tapestry as a multi-year legacy project for Plymouth’s 400th anniversary commemoration.

ELIZABETH CREEDEN is an artist, designer, needlewoman, and educator. For the past forty years, she has worked as a professional embroiderer specializing in historic techniques. Today she is engaged full-time in designing and executing Pilgrim Hall Museum’s Plymouth Tapestry, a contemporary narrative masterwork capitalizing on her fine art training and lifetime of experience. In its production, she closely directs a team of embroiderers, coaching myriad technical and material choices, and inspiring all to exceed expectation.  Creeden was educated at Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and embraced portraiture, freelance illustration, and architectural drafting. She has crafted embroideries for the Clark Institute, the Concord Museum, the Town of Plymouth (including gifts for its sister city, Shichigahama, Japan), the Nichols House Museum, and the White House, as well as many private commissions. She has taught and lectured widely, including at Winterthur Museum and Plymouth CRAFT.

PAULA MARCOUX of Plymouth MA is a food historian, writer, and editor who is also founding director of Plymouth CRAFT, the Plymouth Center for Restoration Arts and Forgotten Trades. This non-profit collaborative offers workshops by extraordinary artisan/instructors for people passionate about improving their handskills and deepening their understanding of traditional craft. Plymouth CRAFT has presented several workshops on the Plymouth Tapestry. Marcoux is also a member of the Tapestry core stitching team.

Join us for Episode Eleven of our Plymouth 400 CONVERSATIONS series on PACTV (Plymouth Area Community Television)!  The program will air on August 19th & 26th at 7:30PM on Comcast channel 13 and Verizon channel 43 in the towns of Plymouth, Duxbury, Kingston, and Pembroke. After the program airs, you can view the episode here.

Episode 11 will feature the Plymouth Tapestry at Pilgrim Hall Museum.

 

Our guests for this episode are Dr. Donna Curtin, Elizabeth Creeden, and Paula Marcoux.

 

DR. DONNA CURTIN is Executive Director of the Pilgrim Society and Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth, MA, the oldest continuous Museum in the United States, where she stewards the world’s most significant collection of the possessions of the Mayflower Pilgrims and seeks to foster inclusive understandings of America’s colonial beginnings. The Museum commissioned the Plymouth Tapestry as a multi-year legacy project for Plymouth’s 400th anniversary commemoration.

ELIZABETH CREEDEN is an artist, designer, needlewoman, and educator. For the past forty years, she has worked as a professional embroiderer specializing in historic techniques. Today she is engaged full-time in designing and executing Pilgrim Hall Museum’s Plymouth Tapestry, a contemporary narrative masterwork capitalizing on her fine art training and lifetime of experience. In its production, she closely directs a team of embroiderers, coaching myriad technical and material choices, and inspiring all to exceed expectation.  Creeden was educated at Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and embraced portraiture, freelance illustration, and architectural drafting. She has crafted embroideries for the Clark Institute, the Concord Museum, the Town of Plymouth (including gifts for its sister city, Shichigahama, Japan), the Nichols House Museum, and the White House, as well as many private commissions. She has taught and lectured widely, including at Winterthur Museum and Plymouth CRAFT.

PAULA MARCOUX of Plymouth MA is a food historian, writer, and editor who is also founding director of Plymouth CRAFT, the Plymouth Center for Restoration Arts and Forgotten Trades. This non-profit collaborative offers workshops by extraordinary artisan/instructors for people passionate about improving their handskills and deepening their understanding of traditional craft. Plymouth CRAFT has presented several workshops on the Plymouth Tapestry. Marcoux is also a member of the Tapestry core stitching team.

Guests:  Episode 11 will feature the Plymouth Tapestry at Pilgrim Hall Museum. Guests include Dr. Donna Curtin, Executive Director of the Pilgrim Society and Pilgrim Hall Museum, the oldest continuous museum in the United States. Elizabeth Creeden, artist, designer, needlewoman, and educator. She is engaged full-time in designing and executing the Plymouth Tapestry.  Paula Marcoux, food historian, writer, and editor who is also founding director of Plymouth CRAFT, the Plymouth Center for Restoration Arts and Forgotten Trades. She is also a member of the Tapestry core stitching team.

Click for more information.

THIS EVENT WILL BE RESCHEDULED. Please check the Pilgrim Hall Museum website for updates.

Noted Plymouth historian James W. Baker presents the ultimate guide to the history and symbolic role of Plymouth Rock in his new publication, Plymouth Rock’s Own Story, published by the Pilgrim Society. Copies available for purchase and signing. Coffee and refreshments served at 9:30AM, lecture begins at 10:00AM. This event is part of the Spring 2020 Lecture Series at Pilgrim Hall Museum, sponsored by Brabo Benefits, with additional support from Powder Horn Press.

THIS EVENT WILL BE RESCHEDULED. Please check the Pilgrim Hall Museum website for updates.

Pilgrim Hall Museum hosts an evening reception and book launch for a new work of Plymouth history by John G. Turner, professor of religious studies at George Mason University. Turner’s precisely-crafted and far-ranging narrative, They Knew They Were Pilgrims: Plymouth Colony and the Contest for American Liberty, resets Plymouth’s significance in a rapidly evolving colonial world and deftly probes the Pilgrims’ complex relationship to the meanings of liberty. Copies available for purchase and signing. This event is part of the Spring 2020 Lecture Series at Pilgrim Hall Museum, sponsored by Brabo Benefits with additional support from Powder Horn Press.

Light refreshments at 6:30PM; book talk begins at 7:00PM.

Turner presents a rich and complex portrait of early Plymouth, a community often mythologized by the public and overlooked by scholars. Drawing on extensive new research, Turner recasts traditional and counter-narratives of Plymouth’s Pilgrim settlers to present a more complex tale of humanity and honor, brutality and betrayal, extraordinary courage and extreme deprivation, faith, fear, violence, and moral compromise.

They Knew They Were Pilgrims is an American story of freedom and unfreedom, written for Americans of all backgrounds. Mining a wealth of underutilized sources — letters, town records, and other documents — Turner tells familiar history in new ways and with an expanded cast of characters. The Pilgrims emerge as neither heroes nor hypocrites, but instead as real men and women who brought very particular notions of Christian liberty across the Atlantic. Sweeping and authoritative, They Knew They Were Pilgrims provides essential context for debates that remain at the heart of American democracy in our own time.

A special exhibition, pathFOUNDERS: Women of Plymouth, on display through May 10th, presents original objects reflecting four centuries of women’s experience and multimedia presentations giving voice to women of early Plymouth Colony, including Susanna White Winslow, Awashonks, Elinor Billington, Priscilla Mullins Alden, Hobbamock’s wife, and Mary Chilton Winslow.

Pilgrim Hall Museum’s 2019 exhibition resets the 400-year story of Plymouth with a focus on the lives and legacies of pathfounding women. Makers, nurturers, leaders, and survivors, they made history, though their stories are often untold.

Who were the women who shaped Plymouth? The women of the Mayflower, immigrants to a new land, keepers of family and tradition, risk-takers, and founders of a colony. The Wampanoag women present in their own homeland, growers, culture bearers, and clan leaders who became upholders of a way of life threatened by incursion. The women of every era since in Plymouth’s ongoing 400-year history who impacted family and community through their ideas, actions, and example.

This exhibition includes Women 100 – A Digital Archive of Local Women’s History, Activism, & Experience, created by Pilgrim Hall Museum to document a century of local women, in honor of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment granting American women the right to vote. Photographs, film, and oral histories highlight women who impacted their communities through arts and education, family, activism, enterprise, and public service.

A special exhibition, pathFOUNDERS: Women of Plymouth, on display through May 10th, presents original objects reflecting four centuries of women’s experience and multimedia presentations giving voice to women of early Plymouth Colony, including Susanna White Winslow, Awashonks, Elinor Billington, Priscilla Mullins Alden, Hobbamock’s wife, and Mary Chilton Winslow.

Pilgrim Hall Museum’s 2019 exhibition resets the 400-year story of Plymouth with a focus on the lives and legacies of pathfounding women. Makers, nurturers, leaders, and survivors, they made history, though their stories are often untold.

Who were the women who shaped Plymouth? The women of the Mayflower, immigrants to a new land, keepers of family and tradition, risk-takers, and founders of a colony. The Wampanoag women present in their own homeland, growers, culture bearers, and clan leaders who became upholders of a way of life threatened by incursion. The women of every era since in Plymouth’s ongoing 400-year history who impacted family and community through their ideas, actions, and example.

This exhibition includes Women 100 – A Digital Archive of Local Women’s History, Activism, & Experience, created by Pilgrim Hall Museum to document a century of local women, in honor of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment granting American women the right to vote. Photographs, film, and oral histories highlight women who impacted their communities through arts and education, family, activism, enterprise, and public service.

A special exhibition, pathFOUNDERS: Women of Plymouth, on display through May 10th, presents original objects reflecting four centuries of women’s experience and multimedia presentations giving voice to women of early Plymouth Colony, including Susanna White Winslow, Awashonks, Elinor Billington, Priscilla Mullins Alden, Hobbamock’s wife, and Mary Chilton Winslow.

Pilgrim Hall Museum’s 2019 exhibition resets the 400-year story of Plymouth with a focus on the lives and legacies of pathfounding women. Makers, nurturers, leaders, and survivors, they made history, though their stories are often untold.

Who were the women who shaped Plymouth? The women of the Mayflower, immigrants to a new land, keepers of family and tradition, risk-takers, and founders of a colony. The Wampanoag women present in their own homeland, growers, culture bearers, and clan leaders who became upholders of a way of life threatened by incursion. The women of every era since in Plymouth’s ongoing 400-year history who impacted family and community through their ideas, actions, and example.

This exhibition includes Women 100 – A Digital Archive of Local Women’s History, Activism, & Experience, created by Pilgrim Hall Museum to document a century of local women, in honor of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment granting American women the right to vote. Photographs, film, and oral histories highlight women who impacted their communities through arts and education, family, activism, enterprise, and public service.

A special exhibition, pathFOUNDERS: Women of Plymouth, on display through May 10th, presents original objects reflecting four centuries of women’s experience and multimedia presentations giving voice to women of early Plymouth Colony, including Susanna White Winslow, Awashonks, Elinor Billington, Priscilla Mullins Alden, Hobbamock’s wife, and Mary Chilton Winslow.

Pilgrim Hall Museum’s 2019 exhibition resets the 400-year story of Plymouth with a focus on the lives and legacies of pathfounding women. Makers, nurturers, leaders, and survivors, they made history, though their stories are often untold.

Who were the women who shaped Plymouth? The women of the Mayflower, immigrants to a new land, keepers of family and tradition, risk-takers, and founders of a colony. The Wampanoag women present in their own homeland, growers, culture bearers, and clan leaders who became upholders of a way of life threatened by incursion. The women of every era since in Plymouth’s ongoing 400-year history who impacted family and community through their ideas, actions, and example.

This exhibition includes Women 100 – A Digital Archive of Local Women’s History, Activism, & Experience, created by Pilgrim Hall Museum to document a century of local women, in honor of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment granting American women the right to vote. Photographs, film, and oral histories highlight women who impacted their communities through arts and education, family, activism, enterprise, and public service.

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