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Events Calendar

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Plymouth 400
Commemoration

The walk, originally scheduled for August of 2020, will be moved to May, 2021. Final date and details to come.

The Wampanoag Ancestors Walk will be led by the Wampanoag tribes of Massachusetts. Placards will be carried with the names of the original 69 villages of the Wampanoag Nation. Participants will pay homage to Massasoit and King Phillip and will stop at designated sites to bless the spots where Wampanoag ancestors walked. The walk will conclude with a drum ceremony and homage to Native souls, followed by a reception.

This ceremony will be held with visiting dignitaries and local and State officials to remember the Pilgrims and Wampanoag people of 1620 and their contributions and sacrifices. The ceremony will take place at significant monuments in Plymouth. Details for this event are still being formed.

THIS EVENT WILL BE RESCHEDULED. Please check the Pilgrim Hall Museum website for updates.

The Plymouth Tapestry is a heroically-scaled embroidered tapestry that tells the story of Plymouth, Massachusetts through handcrafted needlework. Commissioned by Pilgrim Hall Museum in honor of the 400th anniversary of Plymouth Colony’s founding, the Plymouth Tapestry portrays the experiences of the English settlers who arrived on the Mayflower and the Wampanoag families who inhabited the region for millennia before their arrival.

The multimedia-thread-on-linen embroidery will be comprised of twenty individual six-foot-long panels, created by volunteer embroiderers. On April 16th at a gala reception, the first series of completed panels will be unveiled, including scenes of the Wampanoag village of Patuxcet, and the rise of the Separatist Pilgrim congregation in northern England. Selected panels will be displayed from April 17th through December 30, 2020. The Tapestry will be shown in its entirety on completion, expected in the Fall of 2021.

THIS EXHIBIT HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL PILGRIM HALL MUSEUM REOPENS. Please visit their website for updates.

A special exhibition, pathFOUNDERS: Women of Plymouth, on display through May 10th, presents original objects reflecting four centuries of women’s experience and multimedia presentations giving voice to women of early Plymouth Colony, including Susanna White Winslow, Awashonks, Elinor Billington, Priscilla Mullins Alden, Hobbamock’s wife, and Mary Chilton Winslow.

Pilgrim Hall Museum’s 2019 exhibition resets the 400-year story of Plymouth with a focus on the lives and legacies of pathfounding women. Makers, nurturers, leaders, and survivors, they made history, though their stories are often untold.

Who were the women who shaped Plymouth? The women of the Mayflower, immigrants to a new land, keepers of family and tradition, risk-takers, and founders of a colony. The Wampanoag women present in their own homeland, growers, culture bearers, and clan leaders who became upholders of a way of life threatened by incursion. The women of every era since in Plymouth’s ongoing 400-year history who impacted family and community through their ideas, actions, and example.

This exhibition includes Women 100 – A Digital Archive of Local Women’s History, Activism, & Experience, created by Pilgrim Hall Museum to document a century of local women, in honor of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment granting American women the right to vote. Photographs, film, and oral histories highlight women who impacted their communities through arts and education, family, activism, enterprise, and public service.

Pilgrim Hall Museum opens for the season, featuring permanent gallery displays of original 17th-century artifacts that reveal the story of the Pilgrim settlers and the Native Wampanoag people of early Plymouth Colony. The Museum offers three exhibit galleries, changing exhibitions, a superb orientation film, and an unmatched collection of the actual belongings of the Mayflower Pilgrims. From the humble doll of child passenger Mary Chilton, to the sword of Captain Myles Standish, and the well-worn Bible of Governor William Bradford, authentic objects of 17th-century life offer visitors an intimate gateway to the earliest American immigrant experience.

Special exhibition, pathFOUNDERS: Women of Plymouth, on display through March 8th, presents original objects reflecting four centuries of women’s experience and multimedia presentations giving voice to women of early Plymouth Colony, including Susanna White Winslow, Awashonks, Elinor Billington, Priscilla Mullins Alden, Hobbamock’s wife, and Mary Chilton Winslow.

A special exhibition, pathFOUNDERS: Women of Plymouth, on display through May 10th, presents original objects reflecting four centuries of women’s experience and multimedia presentations giving voice to women of early Plymouth Colony, including Susanna White Winslow, Awashonks, Elinor Billington, Priscilla Mullins Alden, Hobbamock’s wife, and Mary Chilton Winslow.

Pilgrim Hall Museum’s 2019 exhibition resets the 400-year story of Plymouth with a focus on the lives and legacies of pathfounding women. Makers, nurturers, leaders, and survivors, they made history, though their stories are often untold.

Who were the women who shaped Plymouth? The women of the Mayflower, immigrants to a new land, keepers of family and tradition, risk-takers, and founders of a colony. The Wampanoag women present in their own homeland, growers, culture bearers, and clan leaders who became upholders of a way of life threatened by incursion. The women of every era since in Plymouth’s ongoing 400-year history who impacted family and community through their ideas, actions, and example.

This exhibition includes Women 100 – A Digital Archive of Local Women’s History, Activism, & Experience, created by Pilgrim Hall Museum to document a century of local women, in honor of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment granting American women the right to vote. Photographs, film, and oral histories highlight women who impacted their communities through arts and education, family, activism, enterprise, and public service.

The “Our”Story: 400 Years of Wampanoag History exhibit will be on display at the Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s oldest Native American owned and operated museum, from November 1st through December 20, 2019. The Museum is operated by the Mohegan Tribe.  The exhibit will be located across the street from the Museum at the Mohegan Cultural Preservation Center.

Exhibit hours will be Tuesday-Friday from 10am-4pm. During the week of November 19-22, hours will be extended to 10am-6pm.

The Museum is also planning two special Saturday events:

Saturday, November 16th, 11am-12pm: Children’s Story Hour with Robert Peters from the Wampanoag Tribe, who will read his book, “Da Goodie Monsta” based on a dream his son Robert Junior had when he was three years old. The story depicts a monster that is part lion, part bird, and part dragon wearing roller skates. “Da Goodie Monsta” chases away nightmares. The story introduces the reader to a boy named Shaka who has no dreams at all. Come and learn how Shaka finds his dreams. This event is open to all children ages 5 and up.

Saturday, November 23rd, 10am-6pm:  Plymouth 400 History Day.  Learn the real story of the first Thanksgiving.

The “Our”Story: 400 Years of Wampanoag History exhibit is expanded each year leading up to 2020 with additional pieces of Wampanoag history, and will travel throughout the region. The latest chapter is 5th in a series of what will become 7 chapters and is called “Governance.” The unique style of governance practiced by the Wampanoag and other Algonquin nations was so appealing to the founding fathers of the United States that many elements are reflected in the constitution.

For more information on the “Our”Story exhibit, please click here.

The “Our”Story: 400 Years of Wampanoag History exhibit is on display at the Aquinnah Cultural Center on Martha’s Vineyard through October 12, 2019.  The Aquinnah Cultural Center supports the ongoing exploration of Wampanoag culture and serves as a place for the Wampanoag people to express their beliefs and lifeways, as well as a place for visitors to learn about their cultural heritage.

“Our”Story: 400 Years of Wampanoag History is expanded each year leading up to 2020 with additional pieces of Wampanoag history, and will travel throughout the region. The latest chapter is 5th in a series of what will become 7 chapters and is called “Governance.” The unique style of governance practiced by the Wampanoag and other Algonquin nations was so appealing to the founding fathers of the United States that many elements are reflected in the constitution.

For more information on the “Our”Story exhibit, please click here.

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